The Good, The Bad, The Ugly of the first Social Olympics

This posting is for the Daily Post weekly challenge. The question we are to answer is: Has social media changed how you view the Olympics?

I have to admit I did not watch much of the Olympics this year. What little I did see or hear about pretty much turned me off watching it. From my viewpoint it was run on Tweets and which athlete was more fashionable.

Ralph Lauren, via Associated Press

I remember the first article I read was about the sexual escapades of the Olympic athletes.   Seems the Olympic Village was more one big frat party then a place to rest. Read this article here and see what you think.

Then it was the fashion of the Olympic  teams. That was an epic failure and much talked and tweeted about. From the French looking USA outfits, to the blaring red of Spain. Here is another article you might enjoy here.

I think the best example of how Social Media dominated the Olympics this year is with the outpouring of love for USA’s gymnast Gabby Douglas. This tiny little dynamo captured the hearts of Americans and people from all over the world. Not only is she the first African-American to win the All Around Olympic Gold, we watched the 16-year-old grow from a nervous teenager to a confident young woman. Go Gabby!

Getty Images

Although her online popularity started out a bit rocky, when someone tweeted about her hair,  saying she had a bad hairdo! I mean really??? She makes history at the young age of 16 and all you can do is hate on her hair??  That soon changed when a couple of classy ladies decided to start a “Love Gabby” campaign. This article describes that digital movement.

So  there were good, bad and ugly moments during the first Social Olympics. From my perspective, it actually turned me off the games more then turned me on. What’s your opinion?

 

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2 thoughts on “The Good, The Bad, The Ugly of the first Social Olympics

  1. What stood out to me was the complete disconnect between old and new media. NBC paid an obscene amount of money to host the Olympic coverage (which I’m not sure was any different than the amount they paid in the past) and tried to keep up the broadcast walls. Meanwhile, people were able to follow in real time online, either via Twitter and Facebook updates or by tapping into BBC online or some other network. People are moving with technology, institutional powerhouses are not.

    Not that this is new (music industry, publishing, I’m looking at you), but this was another and a very obvious example.

    Like

    1. changeforbetterme

      It certainly was the first Olympics run by social media. I don’t see it going backwards in 4 years. The institutional powerhouses better pay attention. Thanks for reading and commenting.

      Like

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