Posted in Humor, Tuesday's Tongue Twisters

Tuesday’s Tongue Twisters

Hello once again, folks! Here are some more fun tongue twisters for you to enjoy.

Tongue twisters aren’t just for fun you know. They are a huge help with your pronunciation. Many actors and public speakers practice them as a means to better their way of speaking. So think of these as education tools!

tongue-twisters

 

Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep.
The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed
Shilly-shallied south.
These sheep shouldn’t sleep in a shack;
Sheep should sleep in a shed.

 

Imagine an imaginary menagerie manager managing an imaginary menagerie.

 

Three sweet switched Swiss witches
Watch three washed Swiss witch Swatch watch switches.
Which sweet switched Swiss witch watches
Which washed Swiss witch Swatch watch switch?

 

A big bug bit a bold bald bear and the bold bald bear bled blood badly.

 

A maid named Lady Marmalade made mainly lard and lemonade. M’lady lamely never made a well-named, labeled marmalade!

 

A twister of twists once twisted a twist;
A twist that he twisted was a three-twisted twist;
If in twisting a twist one twist should untwist,
The untwisted twist would untwist the twist.

 

 

 

Posted in poetry, postaday, Wednesday Whatever!, writing

Wednesday Whatever!

For today, I thought I would write a poem. I haven’t done that in a while. Here is my little ditty. Hope you enjoy.

 

 

dandelion-333093_1280

 

 

 

Blowing in the Wind

My thoughts are scattered

like the leaves

blowing in the wind

My mind can’t catch hold

of the words skittering

through my imagination

Why can’t they hold still

so I can grab hold

and put them in order

they need to be told

The sentences only make sense

if they follow a pattern

not a bunch of nonsense

The wind, the wind, the wind

it never ceases

Quit blowing my words

hither and yon

How can I write

what I want to say

When all the wind wants to do

is play

 

 

 

**I’m not a poet by any means but I try**

 

 

Posted in Humor, nonfiction, postaday, Wednesday Whatever!, Word Fun

Wednesday Whatever! ~~ Fun With Words

Hello, People! Remember me? Today for Wednesday Whatever I thought we would have another edition of Fun with Words. Being a writer and a lover of words in general, finding the different ways to have fun with words is ….well, fun! Let’s see what I have for you today……

 

Wednesday

 

Today I thought I would bring you some different words you don’t see every day. Words that are unusually specific and therefore, perfect for certain situations and words that are just fun to say.

Like…..

bibliobibuli……people who read too much. (Is that even possible??)

discalced………barefooted (just saying he’s barefooted is not near as much fun as saying, ‘he’s discalced’)

latrinalia………..graffiti found in restrooms. (Here I just thought all those writings were just defacing it!)

recidivist…….one who continually commits crime and seems incurable of criminal tendencies (I have some relatives that are recidivists.)

ultra-crepidarian………….giving opinions or criticism beyond one’s own range of experience. (Wow! They’ve been on facebook!)

walla-walla………..the unintelligible sound made by many people talking at once. (Oh my, our family reunions are full of walla-walla)

tergiversate………to turn one’s back on one’s party or cause; also, to make evasive statements or equivocate. (Trump if full of tergiversates!)

spanghew……….to cause a frog or toad to fly up in the air. (Don’t frighten the frogs!)

frogs

quincunx…………the pattern of five objects arranged such that four of the five objects form a square, while the fifth is positioned in the middle. (The dots on the ‘5’ side of a die are arranged in a quincunx.)

perendinate…………..to put off until the day after tomorrow; also, to keep postponing from day to day. (I always perendinate the bills)

omphalopsychite…………one who contemplates his navel. (Everyone needs a hobby)

jillick……..to skip a stone across water. ( I used to jillick when I was a kid!)

expiscate…….to learn through laborious investigation (As I did with this post!)

donnybrook……….a brawl or heated public dispute.(The last presidential debate was a donnybrook!)

chatoyant…………changing in luster or color, as cat’s eyes. (Now this I did not know!)

floccinaucinihilipilification……..the categorizing of something as worthless. (Like this post!)

 

There you have it people, just a few of the better ones I found. Now I think I need to find a pond so I can jillick and take a break.

 

 

Have you come across any words that are unusual? 

Posted in nonfiction, postaday, Wednesday Whatever!, Word Fun

Wednesday Whatever!

Welcome to another edition of Wednesday Whatever! I bet you are on tenterhooks thinking…..What is she going to talk about today?

Well, there is a hint in the above sentence. Can you find it? No? Ok, let me tell you. It’s the word ‘tenterhook’. I’ve also seen it written ‘tenderhook’, but the right way is tenterhook. A strange kind of word that one doesn’t see too often anymore. But I love using the odd word now and again. Like ‘alas’…I love that word.

So today I thought we might look at words or phrases (idioms) that are sometimes used that we wonder where they came from. Like tenterhook.

It’s meaning, of course, is ‘a state of suspense’. This is via Wikipedia:

Tenterhooks are hooks in a device called a tenter. Tenters were originally large wooden frames which were used as far back as the 14th century in the process of making woollen cloth. After a piece of cloth was woven, it still contained oil from the fleece and some dirt. A craftsperson called a fuller (also called a tucker or wa[u]lker) cleaned the woollen cloth in a fulling mill, and then had to dry it carefully or the woollen fabric would shrink. To prevent this shrinkage, the fuller would place the wet cloth on a tenter, and leave it to dry outdoors. The lengths of wet cloth were stretched on the tenter (from Latin tendere, meaning “to stretch”) using tenterhooks (hooked nails driven through the wood) all around the perimeter of the frame to which the cloth’s edges (selvedges) were fixed, so that as it dried the cloth would retain its shape and size. By the mid-18th century, the phrase “on tenterhooks” came to mean being in a state of tension, uneasiness, anxiety, or suspense, i.e. figuratively stretched like the cloth on the tenter.

 

Drop a Dime

Who besides me (because I’m old) remember saying this? Come on! Fess up! I mean the ‘old’ meaning and not the drug type one! Geesh, people. This means to make a phone call. According to American Idioms:

This is a good phrase to discuss with anyone born after 1970. When pay phones were still around they really did cost 10 cents at one time. The dime was dropped into the slot of the pay phone.

 

payphone_page2

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth

Another oldie but goodie. My mom still uses this one as do several other people I know. Most know what it means of course, but how many know where it came from? American Idioms says:

Horses have gum lines that recede with age. Hence older horses have longer teeth than young horses.
To “look a horse in the mouth” is to examine the horse’s mouth closely to determine its age (and therefore its usefulness and/or worth). To immediately judge a gift based on its worth or usefulness rather than the “thought” behind it considered rude, and ungrateful (it is a gift after all, and didn’t cost the receiver anything).
The phrase is apparently quite old, a Latin version of it appeared in a work by St. Jerome in 420 AD, and it also exists in many languages. An Early english version (1510 AD) appears in John Standbridge’s “Vulgari Standbrigi”: “A gyuen hors may not (be) loked in the tethe.”

 

Close but no cigar

I admit I use this one quite often. It means one almost achieved success, but not quite. I never really gave a thought of where it came from so I thought this was interesting. Who doesn’t love a good carny, eh?

Carnival games of skill, particularly shooting games, once gave out cigars as a prize. A contestant that did not quite hit the target was close, but did not get a cigar.

 

mage by John Leech, from: The Comic History of Rome by Gilbert Abbott A Beckett. Bradbury, Evans & Co, London, 1850s Fulvia
image by John Leech, from: The Comic History of Rome by Gilbert Abbott A Beckett.
Bradbury, Evans & Co, London, 1850s
Fulvia

 

Let the cat out of the bag

I was ignorant about this one. Until now. Poor kitties. According to my reading, this is where it came from.

At medieval markets, unscrupulous traders would display a pig for sale. However, the pig was always given to the customer in a bag, with strict instructions not to open the bag until they were some way away. The trader would hand the customer a bag containing something that wriggled, and it was only later that the buyer would find he’d been conned when he opened the bag to reveal that it contained a cat, not a pig. Therefore, “letting the cat out of the bag” revealed the secret of the con trick.

 

Rule of thumb

We all probably know saying this means something that is usually right, but not always. Did you know where it came from?

Based on the use of ones thumb as a rough measurement tool. Generally correct for coarse measures.
Most old English measures of distance were based on the body measurements of the king — the length of the foot, inch (thumb tip to first knuckle), cubit (elbow-to-fingertip), and yard (nose-to-fingertip).

 

Toe the line

Some people mistakenly say or write ‘tow the line’. Alas, this is wrong! It really is toe the line, which means, of course, a person is expected to do what is right. Here is why.

This term comes from military line-ups for inspection. Soldiers are expected to line up, that is put their toes on a line, and submit to the inspection.

 

And there you have my lesson for today. So toe the line and don’t look a gift horse in the mouth and accept my small piece of advice. Write it right!

 

 

What kind of old phrases do YOU use? 

 

 

Posted in Blog challenge, Humor, NaBloPoMo, Nano Poblano, nonfiction, postaday, writing

Fun With Words ~~~ Palindromes

Hello, People!

Today I thought we would have some fun with words. Words have always fascinated me, thrilled me, confused me, and made me either laugh or grimace. Words are great to play with too.

101310 Frankd & Earnest Palindrome

Like palindromes. I used to try to do them when I was a kid. Nerdy, right? For those who don’t know what palindromes are, here is the definition:

A palindrome is a word, phrase, verse or sentence that reads the same backward or forward.

They have to make sense, though! You can’t just throw a bunch of letters together. It has to be a real sentence or word to count as a palindrome. Here are some to give you an example.

  • Madam, I’m Adam.
  • Was it a bat I saw?
  • Otto
  • Hannah
  • Bob
  • A Santa at Nasa
  • Ma has a ham
  • Olson is in Oslo
  • Todd erases a red dot
  • refer
  • Harpo: Not on Oprah
  • Rise to vote sir
  • civic
  • a nut for a jar of tuna

 

Funny-pictures-taco-cat-is-a-palindrome

 

Wasn’t that fun? How many can you come up with?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Blogging, Guest posts, nonfiction, postaday, writing

Guest Post ~~ Arcane Words ~~ A Fish of Gold Specialty!

Hello People!

I know it’s been awhile since I’ve posted. Sorry about that. Been super busy most times and super lazy other times. Ha! I’ll have a post on Monday with a surprise. You won’t want to miss this one and I’m super excited! (I’ll give you a hint…it’s book related!)

Now onto my special guest poster for today. Many of us know her as Fishy, Goldy or Fish of Gold. I know her as ‘friend’. Please welcome a rare occurrence in Blogville, a guest post by our own Goldfish. Even though she is going through some difficult times, she volunteered to do a guest post for me. I feel honored. Thank you, Fishy! ❤

She’s here with some arcane words and their meanings. I love when she shows us some of the long forgotten words of days gone by. Take it away Fishy!

 

fishyguestpost

A long time ago, Jackie put out a request for guest posts. Since I love Jackie, I said I’d oblige. Then, as life does, my world exploded and I couldn’t find the time. I could barely find time to post on my own blog. The nagging knowledge that I still owed her a guest post ate away at me. So today, even though I still don’t have the time, I’m writing a guest post.

I asked Jackie for a prompt since coming up with things to say on other people’s blogs can sometimes be difficult. She said, “As for subjects, how about one of your famous arcane word posts? I love when you come up with old words and tell us what they are about.”

That’s what you’ll get. Here are some words that should be used more often. Some of them don’t even have synonyms.

cacaesthesia

noun

1 a morbid sensation
The cacaesthesia felt as if someone was walking on her grave.
2 (medical) abnormal dysfunctional sensations on the skin; a feeling of numbness, tingling, prickling, or a burning or cutting pain

Synonyms: (medical) paraesthesia

Alternate forms: cacaesthesia, cacesthesia, kakesthesia

Etymology: Modern Latin, from Greek aisthesis ‘feeling’ or ‘sensation,’ + Greek kakos ‘bad’

haplography 

noun

1. omission of syllables in words over time
The English word idolatry comes from the Greek eidololatreia, but one syllable has been lost through haplography.

Etymology: from Greek: haplo– ‘single’ + –graphy ‘writing’

haplology

noun

1. omission of a doubled or similar sound or syllable in a word
Her tendency to haplolgy continually made her misspell Mississippi as Missippi.
Etymology: from Greek: haplo– ‘single’ + logos ‘speech’

oncethmus

noun

1. a bray; the loud, harsh cry of a donkey or mule
2. spoken or written word continuing at length and in a tedious way
The oncethmus of politicians only gets worse once they’re elected.

Synonyms: bloviation, circumlocution, diffuseness, diffusion, garrulity, garrulousness, logorrhea, long-windedness, periphrasis, prolixity, redundancy, verbalism, verboseness, verbosity, windiness, wordage, wordiness

Etymology: Greek ὀγκηθµός ‘bray’

ostranenie

noun
1. defamiliarization
2. a sensation of being unfamiliar with something familiar
Have you ever experienced ostranenie when you think about your own name?
3. An artistic technique of presenting to audiences common things in an unfamiliar or strange way in order to enhance perception of the familiar. A central concept in 20th-century art and theory, ranging over movements including Dada, postmodernism, epic theatre, and science fiction, it is also used as a tactic by recent movements such as culture jamming.

Etymology: Russian остранение ‘defamiliarization’ first coined in 1917 by Viktor Shklovsky in his essay “Art as Device” (alternate translation: “Art as Technique”) (Crawford 209)

vorfreude

noun

1. joyful anticipation
She experienced vorfreude at the thought of summer vacation.

Etymology: German vor-‘pre-‘ (denotes primarily that something is before or in front of another thing or higher in a hierarchy) + freude ‘joy’

scaevity

noun

1. unluckiness
Scaevity caused him to fail.
2. left-handedness
She attributed her hard life to bad luck, but it was really scaevity.

Etymology: 1600s, unknown

 

 

Thank you again Fishy! I really appreciate the guest post and learning some new, old words!

 

Posted in Mi Vida Loca, nonfiction, poetry, postaday, Stories of my life, writing

Silence ~~~ A Poem

wavescrashing

Silence

 

The silence is so loud now, hurting my heart

Echoes of words past, drop like jagged rocks into my memory

Words spoken that had no substance, no real truth

A smooth flow of silver, wrapped around my soul

 

Silence mocks me, cutting, making me bleed sorrow

How could words softly spoken, scream my shame of belief

Wanting, needing, to end the jumble of letters falling

My ears now closed, no more to hear the crash of pretending

 

Eyes wide, filled with the hurt of the silent emptiness

Age should have been a barrier, a roadblock, a dead end

Instead, words moved the barriers, made them inconsequential

Slowly, rebuilding, rewording, battered but not broken

 

Silence, used, can be so powerful, so hurtful, so final

 

 

Posted in Blog challenge, NaPoWriMo, nonfiction, poetry, writing

NaPoWriMo Poem Day 29 ~~~ Old Friends

source
source

Old Friends

Books, books, books
friends from long ago
Alice, Jo, Huck, Jane
Names written on my heart
characters that kept me company
on many a long lonely day

Books, books, books
the smell of ink on paper pages
the feel of them between my fingers
black letters dance before my eyes
taking me to new places and old
adventures to be had, tales to be told

Books, books, books
they can make me laugh, cry, think
stories take hold, don’t let go
till the last page is read to the end
many times beyond as my mind
takes flight, I am that character I find

Books, books, books
Old friends, new
safe havens, they never let me down
No one is ever alone, when they
pick up a book and open its cover
to worlds renowned……..

This poem came about from my love of books and the written word. Hope you enjoyed. 

Posted in Blog challenge, Daily Prompt, Fiction, NaPoWriMo, poetry, writing

NaPoWriMo Day 11 Poem ~~ Being Mellow

source
source

Taking Time to Mellow Out

The alarm rings, jarring me out of sweet dreams
I yawn, stretch, not wanting to rise
Swing my legs over the edge of the bed
Stand and scratch, another day begins

The day drags on and I’m worked to the end
My boss is an idiot and I just shake my head
Wishing I was rich, no need for this job
Watch the clock till my time is done

Finally, the end of my work day arrives
I run out of the door, my way is clear
I start my car and the music blares
The sound washing my boredom away

I drive home shaking off the day’s frustrations
Thinking of hot coffee, freedom, relaxation
But first to walk the dog, feed the cat
Make dinner, call friends, sort the mail

I drink coffee, eat my food, watch a bit of news
Then finally, when I’m all relaxed, my fun resumes
My music plays softly, I open a book, I laze on the couch
The words they take me so far away

This is how I mellow out my days and night
After the world gets rough in its play
I go somewhere else, even if only in my mind
For adventures, comedy, drama, mystery, suspense

It’s a world of words, but it’s so real to me
I feel my cares get washed away in black/white squiggles
Whether I write them or someone else, makes no difference
Imagination is a great place to be, so I visit regularly

 

 

This was written for two challenges, NaPoWriMo and the WordPress Daily Prompt, which was; After a long day at work or school, what are your favorite ways to wind down and decompress?

Hope you all enjoyed my efforts.